PEN Lecture Series

Academic Year 2018-2019

The Ph.D. in Educational Neuroscience (PEN) Program proudly presents the 2018-2019 PEN Distinguished Lecture Series in Educational Neuroscience.

 

"From Mirror Neurons to Society:
How the Brain and Experience Provide
New Insights into Learning"


Presented in conjunction with the PEN 701 Proseminar, the PEN Program's 2018-2019 PEN Distinguished Lecture Series in Educational Neuroscience honored world-renowned scientists and helped to form a bridge between science and society. 

Download the 2018-2019 PEN Distinguished Lecture Series program book.

The 2018-2019 presenters have helped change the landscape of science. This year, each presenter shared their discoveries with attendees as we forge new links across research communities within Gallaudet University, Washington, D.C., and the world. Learn more about each presenter below.              

View All Lectures
All lectures are available at Gallaudet University's Archive Media Channel. Additional lectures from 2008 to the present are also archived and available on this channel.

 

Presentations

Dr. Giacomo Rizzolatti
Dr. Giacomo Rizzolatti
On October 25, 2018, Dr. Giacomo Rizzolatti presented, “The ‘Mirror’ Brain,” the first lecture of 2018-19 fall semester for the Gallaudet University PhD in Educational Neuroscience Program's Distinguished Lecture Series.
Dr. Sebastian Lipina
Dr. Sebastian Lipina
On November 15, 2018, Dr. Lipina presented "Contemporary Neuroscientific Contributions to the Study of Childhood Poverty."
Dr. Sian Beilock
Dr. Sian Beilock
On February 21, 2019, Dr. Sian Beilock presented, "Overcoming anxiety about math," at the PEN Distinguished Lecture Series.
Dr. Josef Rauschecker
Dr. Josef Rauschecker
Where did language come from? Evolutionary precursor mechanisms in the brain of nonhuman primates

With all its uniqueness in humans, language and music must have its evolutionary origins in nonhuman animals. Dr. Rauschecker contends that it makes sense to search for traces of brain mechanisms supporting communication in our closest relatives, nonhuman primates. Monkeys have a well-developed system of communication calls and an auditory cortex that is organized very much like ours. Ventral and dorsal processing streams support similar functions in both the visual and the auditory systems of humans and monkeys. Where then is the difference that makes us human? It appears possible that nonhuman primates possess most of the necessary ingredients for successful communication, but have them to a lesser degree, so they do not reach the critical mass for a full-blown language system. Dr. Rauschecker states that studies using identical techniques in both species may help to bring us closer to an answer.