Early Education Literacy Lab (EL2)

Extended Education Longitudinal Study (EELS-II)

After a three-year gap in data collection, during which the EL2 Lab has been analyzing and publishing data from the Early Education Longitudinal Study (EELS-I), we are excited to announce the launch of the Extended Education Longitudinal Study (EELS-II). Funded in part by a Priority Research Fund grant from Gallaudet's Research Support and International Affairs group, EL2 will launch a follow-up study of the EELS-I participants, again visiting their schools and conducting achievement assessments in the areas of Literacy, Numerical Cognition and Mathematics, and Writing. Combined with EELS-I data, this new data will allow us to thoroughly examine the relationships among early education school, home, and child characteristics, and achievement in late-elementary and middle school.

Language, Mathematics, Cognition, and Learning:

The Extended Educational Longitudinal Study (EELS-II)

Sherry Eyer,  Thomas Allen,  Donna Morere,   Ilaria Berteletti

 Abstract

Despite normal levels of intelligence, deaf children remain behind their hearing peers in academic achievement. Evidence highlights the importance of early language access for later academic success.  Little research tracks achievement for deaf children with a view toward identifying the role language in later cognitive and academic development. The current research will contribute basic knowledge through building on a previous longitudinal study that tracked deaf children and their emergent literacy skills from age 3 to 7.  We seek to investigate whether previously observed relationships between early language skills and emergent literacy among these children predict later literacy and numeracy outcomes. We hypothesize that the impact of language skills on early reading will persist through all stages of reading skill development and also predict cognitive skills associated with numeracy through middle school. The proposed research would follow this cohort of children for an additional three years (beginning at age 10) with math and reading assessments, and allow us to develop and test models of learning that include indicators of early visual language experience and the reading and math outcomes. Influences of home and classroom strategies on academic growth trajectories for children with different language histories and demographic backgrounds will be evaluated.