PEN Lecture Series

Academic Year 2011-12

Continuing a center tradition, we are excited to feature ten outstanding researchers, scholars, and visionaries for the 2011-2012 academic year. We will cover topics that vary from gestural interfaces in learning to artistic approaches in interactive storytelling. Research findings under discussion will include infant eye gaze, language acquisition, and bimodal bilingualism.

All presentations are open to the public and will take place in B111 in the Merrill Learning Center (the Library), from 4:00 - 5:30 p.m.

Interpreters and CART services will be provided.

For full abstracts and biographies, please go to VL2 website (vl2.gallaudet.edu).

Live Streaming Available

Please visit vl2.gallaudet.edu to obtain the URL for live streaming of the presentations; highspeed internet access is necessary for the best viewing experience.

We will announce the URLs approximately 2 weeks prior to each presentation date.

Archived Presentations

All the presentations from 2008 to present are available on the VL2 website and on the Gallaudet University Video Library Catalog.

Presentations

Barbara Tversky
Barbara Tversky
Thursday, September 29, 2011 4:00 PM
Tools for Thought

Thinking can overwhelm the mind and the mind makes use of the body, the world, and things in the world. Some of the ways that tools for thought augment thought will be illustrated by research on diagrams, sketches, and gestures.

Laura-Ann Petitto
Laura-Ann Petitto
Wednesday, October 12, 2011 4:00 PM
Three Revolutions: Advancing new discoveries and change in society through scientific insights from Linguistics, Culture, and Biology.

Linguistics, Culture, and Biology Petitto lays bare core insights from scientific research in linguistics, culture, and biology, which together provide compelling new conclusions about the biological foundations of human language, and the essence of language. Special emphasis is placed on neuroimaging and behavioral findings from her own laboratory.

Thangi Appanah
Thangi Appanah
Thursday, October 27, 2011 4:00 PM
How Self-Editing Improves the Writing Performance of Signing Adolescent Deaf Students.

This presentation discusses a study on the impact of student use of a rubric on the writing performance of adolescent deaf students whose primary language is ASL. Writing performance indicated that the rubric was most effective when students discussed the rubric with adults, and they also improved in the language used to describe their writing.

Tali Krakowsky
Tali Krakowsky
Wednesday, November 9, 2011 4:00 PM
The Spaces in Between

Our digital world is transforming our physical architecture and how we inhabit, think, and behave within it. The seamless integration of emerging media, interactive content, cinematic storytelling, performance and architecture can engage culture in new conversations. These smart, artful, meaningful, useful and playful spaces that could potentially change the way we think and behave. Innovations in design, culture and technology empower us to explore the spaces in between words, things, objects and thoughts.

Kenneth Pugh
Kenneth Pugh
Thursday, February 2, 2012 4:00 PM
Neuroimaging studies of Reading and Language Development: An update on recent findings.

Development: An Update on Recent Findings Findings on the plasticity of the brain have suggested a new perspective on reading disability, especially in relation to the development and integration of the left hemisphere posterior reading system. Implications for theory and practice will be discussed. Finally, new and ongoing longitudinal studies examining gene-brain-behavior relations in high risk children are discussed.

David Plaut
David Plaut
Wednesday, February 15, 2012 4:00 PM
Visual recognition of faces and words: Two sides of the same brain?

Current research in cognitive neuroscience on visual recognition of faces and words suggests that cognitive behavior is supported, not by dedicated modules, but by highly distributed and interactive cortical networks whose organization is strongly experience-dependent. Current studies suggest the partial co-mingling of face and word processing.

Kristin Snoddon
Kristin Snoddon
Thursday, March 1, 2012 4:00 PM
American Sign Language and Early Intervention

Snoddon presents two research studies on Deaf and hearing parents and young children participating in family ASL and literacy programs in Ontario, Canada. Collectively, the findings from these studies highlight the benefits of emergent ASL and literacy, and provide an evidence-based rationale for governments and government agencies to better support this development through partnerships with the Deaf ASL community.

Rain Bosworth
Rain Bosworth
Wednesday, March 21, 2012 4:00 PM
Laterality of Motion and Orientation Discrimination in Deaf and Hearing Subjects

Results from Bosworth’s study suggest lateralized effects of sign language and/or deafness on the dorsal and ventral stream functions in the visual system. Relevance to previous literature will be discussed.

David Quinto-Pozos
David Quinto-Pozos
Thursday, April 5, 2012 4:00 PM
Developmental signed language disorders: considering visual cognition

One question is whether developmental signed language disorders mirror those found for spoken languages or if such disorders are unique to the visual-gestural modality. This presentation will discuss a case of developmental signed language disorder.

Erin Wilkinson
Erin Wilkinson
Wednesday, April 18, 2012 4:00 PM
Unlocking the grammatical system of SELF: A functional description

SELF is conventionally defined as an ASL grammatical sign functioning as a reflexive pronoun similar to English - self. The main question of the study is: if ASL has a variety of SELF forms, then do they all function similarly and/or differently in ASL grammar? Wilkinson's corpus-based study of 15 hours finds that ASL has three distinct forms of SELF, and these forms express a range of grammatical functions. The distributional analysis shows that SELF is not best analyzed as a reflexive pronoun but instead can be viewed as an emphatic marker. In the talk, she will present evidence that the grammatical system of SELF is more complex than traditionally described.